Road to China Light Collection

My latest collection came out in August – four lacy pieces in The Fibre Co. Road to China Light with Kelbourne Woolens!

Road to China Light is made up 65% baby alpaca, 15% silk, 10% camel, and 10% cashmere – so it’s super duper soft and so, so warm! So we decided to go with a lace theme, something that I appreciate since I overheat easily.

Photos by Linette Kielinski via Kelbourne Woolens.

Cathedral Grove Wrap

cathedral grove knit wrap pattern

Cathedral Grove is a nice huge wrap, worked from side to side in 3 colours of RTCL. I adore this colour combo, especially that gold! A simple 3 row pattern means this piece is reversible (a good thing for wraps!) and the slipped stitch edging keeps the edges tidy.

Hopewell Rocks Pullover

hopewell rocks knit pullover pattern

Hopewell Rocks is a simple tee worked in 2 pieces (front and back) with short knit-on sleeves and an all-over intuitive lace pattern. I’d love to see this over a dress!

Mackenzie River Cowl

mackenzie river knit cowl pattern

Mackenzie River is a cowl I’m quite chuffed about – it has a diagonally travelling lace pattern and easy ridged stockinette. Perfect for knitting on the go, once you get the 2-round lace pattern memorized!

Rainy Lake Cardigan

rainy lake knit lace cardigan pattern

Rainy Lake is the type of cardigan I wear all the time – soft, warm, and easy to throw on over almost anything! Lace panels are worked on the front and back, with long stockinette sleeves. Rainy Lake is knit in pieces and seamed, and available in sizes 33-57.25″!

More on the collection

Check out the full collection and yarn on Kelbourne Woolens

I also did a fun interview with Kate about the collection and my work.

Bonus: Sewn Bind-off tutorial for Mackenzie River – it’s a little labour intensive but I love the look of this sewn bind off for cowls and wraps. It matches a cable or long-tail cast on perfectly.

summer days, drifting away

First off, I’m running a birthday sale on Ravelry – 30% off all my self-published individual patterns (excludes third party publications and ebooks). Ends tonight, August 2, at midnight so hurry on over to my Ravelry page!

birthday-sale-on-ravelry

This summer has been flying by! We’re staying in town this year instead of travelling, so it’s been pretty quiet. Super glad we were able to get air conditioning installed before the weather really heated up since we’re spending lots of time at home.

We went strawberry picking (along with everyone else) on Canada Day weekend. Super crowded but it wasn’t too hot that day, and we came away with about 14 pounds of berries. I made 5 pints of freezer jam – I love the fresh taste since it’s not cooked, but it does take up a lot of room in the bottom-drawer freezer. I also made a batch of cooked, canned jam, and some strawberry buttermilk ice cream from that batch.

picking-strawberries

We’ve gone down to the beach a few times. The eastern end is off-leash, so there’s always a lot of cute dogs to pet there (and it’s less busy). The water levels are super high this year and sections are closed – it’s crazy to see the water over walkways that are usually several feet above!

Can you see the CN Tower?

Cherries went on super sale in July ($1.67/lb!) so I bought three bags and made some cherries in syrup and a bit of cherry compote.

Dale’s birthday was in July, and we decided to go out to the Aga Khan museum since we hadn’t been yet. Unfortunately I should have made a reservation for the restaurant as it was full up when we got there. Oh well. It’s a small museum but really interesting.

I made a cake to take up to the farm for his family party – it’s funfetti (vanilla with sprinkles) with raspberry frosting. I, um, didn’t measure or stencil so the 30 is a bit off centre, whoops!

I’ve been sewing a little bit: I finished a Dress No. 1 from the awesome Sonya Philip in some cotton that I got at the Textile Museum sale a few years ago – the print matches well on one side but not the other! I added in-seam pockets as well. The fabric isn’t great for this, it rides up a bit, but at least I know what to fix for next time.

I also finally finished up a dress I started last summer, Alabama Chanin’s corset dress. The front and back each have 3 pieces, and I added in-seam pockets here as well. The whole thing is hand-stitched, including felling all the seams. I’m really happy with this one! It’s in a very light t-shirt jersey that feels like cotton to me (it was unlabeled).

Knitting-wise I’ve mostly been working on secret stuff, but I found some time to play around with a new idea. Yarn is Lichen and Lace worsted.

I also just finished up a nice light pullover out of Quince & Co’s fingering weight linen, just needs the ends woven in and a good blocking.

The garden is going bonkers – it’s the first year we’re not gardening on a balcony and it’s great! The raised beds are from (several) kits that just slide together, and we made sure to put up a lot of protection from critters. We were pretty late getting everything in the ground but things have really come along nicely. There’s some tiny little beans, peas, zucchini, cucumber, and tomatoes!

June 20:

August 2:

We had to add extra stakes to the tomatoes – they’re 8 feet tall! At this rate we’re going to need stepladders to harvest.

For my birthday we went out to the Ontario Science Centre and saw an Imax movie, then went out to sushi. We usually go to a lot of museums on vacation, so going to 2 museums in a week definitely had that vacation feel!

My cake was a hilarious half-cake made by cutting one layer in half and stacking. Black Forest, yum.

How’s your summer going?

New Pattern: Sackville Shawl

It’s been ages since I self-published a pattern, so I’m especially pleased to present the Sackville Shawl! This generously sized (80″ wingspan) worsted weight shawl works up fast from the neck down, with an all-over lace pattern and garter stitch border. Buy, fave and queue Sackville Shawl on Ravelry!

Sackville features yarn from my friend Megan, who used to run Lettuce Knit! She’s moved out to the east coast and has been dyeing up a storm. Sackville uses her worsted weight yarn, in the awesome colourway “sea glass”. I didn’t pay much attention to the order of my 3 skeins, but it worked out so that there’s more pink bits towards the bottom of the shawl for a subtle gradient.

Sackville is knit from the top down, beginning with an interesting Disappearing Loop cast-on instead of a garter tab. It’s similar to an adjustable loop in crochet, and I’ve also seen a similar one called the “pinhole cast on” (which has an extra step or two). In the Sackville pattern I’ve included a photo tutorial to help get you started.

Sackville Shawl is presented as both charted and row-by-row written directions. The lace pattern stitches don’t quite stack on top of each other; instead, they’re a little offset at the beginning of each repeat, so the lattice is a little wonky! I quite like that. Increases at the edges on both sides result in a nice wide shawl that’s easy to wrap around, and the stockinette rolled edge along the top makes for a tidy finish that’s still easy to stretch out for blocking.

Once you’ve completed the lace patterns a few times, the border is very easy – just a few rows of garter stitch then a pretty picot bind-off. It should be simple to resize this shawl for different weights of yarn and different amounts – you can pretty much finish after any lace repeat (although you may have to rejig the picot spacing on the bind off if you have a different number of total stitches).

Buy Lichen and Lace yarns

Buy, fave and queue Sackville Shawl on Ravelry!