I’ve been window shopping tons of yarn lately and thought I’d share – some Canadian yarns, some not, but all totally beautiful and covetable! This season I’m all about round, squishy, bouncy wools (when am I not, though?), single breeds, and both rich colours and natural ones.

I don’t have any affiliations with any of these yarn companies or shops. Consumerism ahoy!

Canadian Yarns

photo: Colorsong yarnPhoto: Colorsong

Fleece Artist Coraline (via Colorsong) – bulky Corriedale, dyed in Canada by one of my longstanding favourite Canadian yarn companies! The colours are always amazing, and this yarn looks so squishy and warm.

photo: gala woolPhoto: Gala Wool

Gala Wool merino – pretty *ahem* old-school website, but the yarn looks so squishy! Wool raised in Saskatchewan, naturally dyed in BC.

photo: Roving Winds FarmPhoto: Roving Winds Farm

Roving Winds Farm cashmere – Canadian cashmere? Yes please.

photo: Sweet FiberPhoto: sweet fiber

sweet fiber cormo – this was a limited edition yarn and I don’t think it’s even available (sorry!) but I can still enjoy the photos and idea of it! Cormo is one of my all-time favourite wool breeds.

Non-Canadian

photo: TONOFWOOLPhoto: TONOFWOOL

TONOFWOOL cormo – Australian cormo, spun in New Zealand – it was available in the US at Woolful Mercantile but is sold out. Drool.

photo: ElsawoolPhoto: Elsawool

Elsawool woolen spun, worsted weight cormo. All the things I love.

Photo: O-WoolPhoto: O-Wool

O-Wool Classic Worsted – 100% certified organic merino wool, tightly spun and plied for both durability and softness! I’ve used O-Wool’s Legacy DK for my Tiverton cabled pullover and it was awesome.

photo: Dirty Water DyeworksPhoto: Dirty Water Dyeworks

I’m actually knitting with Dirty Water Dyeworks Johanna right now – and I want more! It’s Targhee wool, which is soft and squishy but still with body and heft. Plus it comes in huge skeins! Lovely, lovely.

photo: Sincere SheepPhoto: Sincere Sheep

Sincere Sheep Equity Fingering – a bouncy, semi-woolen Rambouillet wool from Wyoming.

photo: knit purlPhoto: Knit Purl

Have you heard about Woolfolk? The fiber is harvested from “Ovis XXI Ultimate Merino” sheep in Patagonia and given 2 different treatments – Tynd (fingering weight, standard ply) and Får (shown above), which is a worsted weight chainette. I love chainette yarns and hope to actually try this one soon! My friend Olga designed the inaugural collection and it is all so beautiful.

photo: YOTHPhoto: YOTH

Last but not least? YOTH yarns, merino/cashmere/nylon blend in two weights, dyed in a food-inspired palette.

Whew, that’s a lot of pretty yarn to look at! What yarns are you coveting these days? A knitter can dream…

4 Responses to “the yarn wants”

  1. Sarah V.

    Oh man, I LOVE this roundup, especially the Canadian yarns! I’ve been following the Ton of Wool project for a few years now, too, and would love to try out their cormo. Thanks for sharing all of this!

    Reply
  2. Beth

    Thanks so much, Laura, for these leads on Canadian cashmere, and wool from Saskatchewan.

    Reply

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