I’ve picked up my rigid heddle loom (an Ashford) again, finally! It’s been sitting around for quite awhile, but I think various woven pretties around the web finally gave me the kick I needed!

i'm weaving! i'm weaving!

And damn, is it ever fast. Last night it took about 2 hours to warp up the loom (direct warping with a peg), and it’ll probably take a little less time next time I go at it, because I learned some things (like which way to turn the back dealie to wind on the warp).

Then I got down to the weaving, and after a few more hours today, it was off the loom!

fresh off the loom

Then I needed to finish the ends.

tying fringe

I decided to go with a medium length fringe (about six inches) and two rows of knots.

I used 2 skeins of Fleece Artist Cashlana for this wrap/scarfy thing, every last bit (although there’s quite a fair amount of waste in little pieces that gets cut off). It was a fairly variegated green mix, but I think the weaving shows off the colour variation really well! Last thing was to wet-finish the piece, so it’s hanging to dry now – finished photos soon.

Now I want to weave more stuff, but I can’t decide on what. Another wrap in a different colour? Dishtowels? A blanket? And what yarns shall I use? Decisions, decisions.

28 Responses to “more ways to use up yarn”

  1. luneray

    What’s the pink yarn at the bottom of the second picture? I obviously don’t know anything about weaving except that one direction is warp and the other is weft but which is which?

    I made your Thermal sweater for myself. It was my first adult sized sweater…and I’m a big lady! But I finished it the other day and it is light but warm and I’ve received lots of compliments on it.

    Reply
  2. Dani

    It’s very pretty Laura! If you are worried about how much you waste on the front and back of the loom, you can use “waste yarn” – small pieces tied onto each warp strand at the front and back. It allows you to weave right to the edge of your actual warp. And you can leave the waste yarn on the loom, sleyed through the reed, and then just tie your next project to the waste yarn. Keeps you from having to sley again. I hope that is making sense…..here is an example: http://blog.sweetgeorgiayarns.com/2006/06/not-my-loom/

    Reply
  3. Adriana

    That is gorgeous! I was just yesterday thinking that I’d love to learn how to weave. I’ll add it to the “someday” list.

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  4. Marie

    I didn’t know looms came in such small, managable sizes! How much more tempting when I know I don’t have to dedicate a room of the house in order to be able to weave!

    Reply
  5. Stephanie

    Man, that’s pretty! I used to weave but sold my loom when I moved to New York. I can see myself getting sucked in again sometime soon.

    Go for a blanket! Why think small? ;)

    Reply
  6. Knittingarch

    This is seriously awesome! Let’s see, I started knitting, then learned to cross stitch, then embroider, now crochet, drop spinning, sewing…I have very little time to do any of them on a regular basis, but…I want to learn to weave now…. Nooooooooo!

    Reply
  7. beverly

    Beautiful!

    I’m taking a weaving class at Webs this summer, and I’m so excited to decide on a rigid heddle loom to purchase. What width is yours? Are you happy with that width?

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  8. Jo

    It’s absolutely beautiful – I love all those light greens. I can’t wait to see the finished object.

    Reply
  9. Jessica K.

    This is amazing! Now I really want a little loom. I did an apprenticeship with a weaver who had me stuck up in the attic, untangling yarn on these giant looms, all by myself, every Saturday for several months. Then I quit and thought I hated weaving… until this post!

    Hmm..

    Reply
  10. Cirilia

    Yeah! Up with RH weaving!! I just finished a scarf today, I used Elsebeth Lavold’s Silky Wool. Now I’m inspired to blog about it.

    Gorgeous scarf/wrap! I think you should do a whole rainbow’s worth, what an awesome accessory. I wear mine ALL the TIME.

    Reply
  11. sari

    that is really pretty! i was recently given a loom, i think it is called an “inkle” loom. you may have just inspired me to clear out a space for it in my house and do something. thanks! :)

    Reply
  12. Steph

    Woah, that is so pretty! That project made me consider learning to weave for a moment. ;)

    Reply
  13. Dr. Steph

    It’s beautiful. Weaving is the thing I want to do way more than spinning. This is not helping me avoid that lure.

    And the cashlana–purrr.

    Reply
  14. Marie-Michèle

    sigh…
    you have to stop making such beautiful things…
    now I want a loom too!
    this is just gorgeous!

    Reply
  15. Cirilia

    WOWZERS. I have gotten more hits from you linking me than I did when I was on Stash and Burn, in the Classic Elite Newsletter…on the the Blueprint blog…crazy. Thanks!

    Reply
  16. chris

    i love that loom! where did you purchase it from? and what size is it?

    Reply
  17. Seanna Lea

    I love all the greens!

    Weaving is one of the things I haven’t tried yet, so it is interesting to see what other people have made.

    Reply
  18. tina

    Like the Pied Piper you are! I ordered a loom, hopefully it will be here by my vacation. I see stash busting in my future! Everything you have made is gorgeous! I hope I take to weaving as well as you have!

    Reply

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