So. Not so much knitting the last few days, due to many hours spent getting the garden set up! I neglected to take real “before” photos, but it was a huge mess. Took us more than a day to clean out the weeds and start digging!

Here’s a shot taken midday yesterday – on my brand new graduation-present camera, a Powershot SD750. We’d dug rows to about halfway across the plot.

about halfway

Later on that day…all the rows dug, and beans and peas planted in the last row. Once the peas are done the cucumbers will go there…I’ve really got to get the trellis up before my trip (leaving next Sunday). See the rainbow?

all dug up

And at the end of yesterday – lettuce planted in sort of the middle of things, being watered by the boyfriend. That rather large hole at the front there is where we’d buried a few bags of compost the night before (to prevent it from being stolen, although I don’t think it really would have been).

garden from front

Not much else can go in the ground yet – it’s really a bit too chilly for the rest of things I want to plant: zucchini and summer squash, cucumber, tomatoes (have to wait to buy the seedlings anyway), watermelon, okra, eggplant. So for now we’re concentrating on the early crops and letting the rows weather a bit. The soil is extremely clay-y so we’re working in a lot of compost.

Knitting photos soon – I do have a bit to show!

12 Responses to “dig that thang up”

  1. Kristen

    If they’d steal your compost, wouldn’t they steal your tomatoes even more? I hope you won’t have to camp out next to them as they ripen–though it might be worth the trouble. Fresh garden tomatoes. Mmmmm.

    Reply
  2. Suzanne

    That’s my favorite sort of hard labor. I hope you’re enjoying it, too. Your plot looks lovely. I keep forgetting that the rest of the country has different weather than we do. My tomatoes are already four feet high and covered with fruit, the mulberry tree is sagging with ripe and ripening berries, and the squash plants are truly menacing, with their huge, almost thorny leaves and brilliant yellow flowers. Too bad I can’t grow yarn.

    Reply
  3. Melanie

    Isn’t it great to have a garden? It is still going down below zero at night here but I hope to plant potatoes, onions peas and other hardier things as soon as my load of soil comes in the next day or too. Can’t wait to see a pic of your garden after things start growing.

    Reply
  4. jenna

    What an undertaking! It’ll be brilliant, I’m sure! Keep an eye on that compost, now.

    Reply
  5. Katie

    Wow! I’m so jealous of your community garden plot (the ones in my area have incredibly long wait-lists).

    Reply

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